Director, Chicago, Illinois

Press

Features. Interviews. Press.

 

FEATURES AND INTERVIEWS

AMERICAN THEATRE - 6 THEATRE WORKERS YOU SHOULD KNOW

 

PLAYERS 2016: FIFTY PEOPLE WHO REALLY PEFORM FOR CHICAGO

 

ASK A DIRECTOR - Hannah Wolf's Interview with Marti

 

 

PRESS QUOTES

" Lookingglass may be known for Mary Zimmerman-style shimmering imagery, but there is nothing whatsoever spectacular about "Title and Deed," which is directed with an exceptionally sure and humanistic hand by the rising and talented young director Marti Lyons...There is just one Chicago actor, Michael Patrick Thornton...[who], seems to have an immediate way into Eno's neo-Beckettian style, a sense of Eno's wry humor, a feeling for Eno's way with words and a propensity for heading directly to the emotional jugular." - Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune

“…among the strongest offerings in the delightful history of the Apprentice Company. Filled with ghostly apparitions, clever storytelling devices and some downright scary moments, the nine segments slip effortlessly from giddy fun to disturbing terror in seamlessly integrated tableaus that use startlingly simple special effects” – Marty Rosen, LEO Weekly

"[Calamity West] is also shrewdly teamed up here with director Marti Lyons, who also is the real deal. With these two hugely talented women, you're never ahead of their game. And thus you sit back, enjoy yourself and try to figure out the nature of the play." -- Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune

"...Whereas modern superhero movies are often criticized for the consequence-free “destruction porn” of city-razing climactic battles, Prowess zooms in to examine the damage inflicted on the psyches of these street-level non-supers by fighting violence with violence. Under Marti Lyons’s sharp direction, Holter’s work is engaging and exhilarating, with huge aesthetic assists from Michael Stanfill’s cracking projections and Ryan Bourque’s kickass fight choreography." - Kris Vire, Time Out Chicago

"Neff benefits from the very tight direction of Marti Lyons — this play moves at a blistering pace that ensures its talky, static nature does not land it in the lake. And he also has two terrific Chicago actors baring their souls in a most satisfying fashion." Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune